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Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game to Play at Home!

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game to Play at Home!

Translated by Sandy Lau

Written by MATCHA-PR

2020.12.22 Bookmark

In December 2020, Häagen-Dazs Japan released Häagen Mätching: a game where players match up mini cup lids. In fact, the rules resemble many traditional Japanese games played during the New Year’s holiday. Give it a go and celebrate a Japanese tradition at your home this new year!

A Unique Game by Häagen-Dazs Japan!

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

Häagen-Dazs Japan released a picture-matching game called Häagen Mätching: Match the Flavors (Häagen Mätching) in December 2020. The game is designed after their mini cup lids, in an effort to encourage a winter vacation spent at home.

It's a fun game to play on your computer or smartphone, wherever you are in the world. What’s more, it resembles Japanese games traditionally played on New Year's Day!

In this article, we’ll teach you how to play “Häagen Mätching: Match the Flavors” and introduce its traditional Japanese game counterparts.

Click to Play Häagen Mätching!

What Kind of Game Is Häagen Mätching?

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

“Häagen Mätching: Match the Flavors” (Häagen Mätching) is a game where players match lids with the same design from eight of Häagen-Dazs Japan’s classic mini cups. In Japan, the signature Häagen-Dazs flavors are Vanilla, Green Tea, Strawberry, Cookies & Cream, Macadamia Nut, Crisp Chip Chocolate, Rich Milk, and Rum Raisin.

Players earn points by turning over the lids and finding two identical designs.

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

“Häagen Mätching” can be enjoyed alone or with two players. On single-player mode, the goal is to collect a certain amount of points within a set timeframe. On two-player mode, the player with the most points wins.

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated. (*This is a concept image)

The game has two difficulty levels. Normal is played with two packs of lids featuring the eight flavors for a total of 16 lids. If you choose the hard level, there will be four lids for each flavor, a total of 32 lids.

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

The game will begin with all lids facing down. Just click on the lids to turn them over. Only two lids can be turned at a time. If the designs do not match, both lids are turned back over. Try to memorize the lid designs before they are flipped downwards!

You’ll acquire two points for every matching lid design you find. Are you confident in your memory skills? Then this game may seem easy for you. However, the lids will be randomly shuffled after a certain number of turns (*).

A warning will appear before the shuffling begins. Nevertheless, you’ll be back at square one once the lids are mixed!

*: The shuffle function only occurs in two-player mode.

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

This game is sure to excite players with its design and mechanics. The background shifts with each stage, the lids are animated and play a pleasant jingle when tapped. Most of all, it’s fun to play a game when your favorite ice cream lids are the artwork! You might even start craving this frozen dessert while playing.

Picture-matching games are known worldwide by names like Match Up, Concentration, and Pairs. In Japan, there are also plenty of traditional playing card games that are enjoyed today. We'll introduce a few of these games below.

Karuta Playing Cards: A Japanese Tradition Enjoyed in the Present Day

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Photo by Pixta

When speaking of traditional Japanese playing cards, karuta comes to mind. Since it's played among three or more people, this game has been a fixture of family gatherings during the New Year’s holiday as far back as the Edo Period (1603-1868).

Each karuta card is printed with a picture and Japanese characters. The most common form of the game is iroha-garuta. A single Japanese character is printed in the upper right-hand corner of the 48 picture cards, which are laid out in front of the players.

Other cards are printed with proverbs that begin with a single character. Once the proverb has been read aloud, players compete to find cards with the corresponding picture and character. This game is great for learning proverbs, leading to its lasting popularity.

Learn Waka Poems with Uta-Garuta

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Photo by Pixta

While iroha-garuta is fun to play with children, uta-garuta is a card game suited to students and adults. Uta-garuta uses waka (*1) poems from a famous collection titled “Hyakunin Isshu” (*2). It is played by reciting the poem’s first verse, then picking the karuta card printed with the following verse.

Historically, uta-garuta was considered a sophisticated pastime, as participants memorized waka poems through playing the game.

*1 Waka is a type of classical Japanese poetry. In particular, waka is often used to refer to tanka, a 31‐syllable poem.
*2 Hyakunin Isshu: a collection of 100 waka poems selected by Fujiwara no Teika (1162-1241), a noble Japanese poet, that were composed during the early Kamakura Period (1185-1333).

Kai-Awase: A Shell Matching Game Played Among Aristocrats

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Photo by Pixta
Another similar game popular among aristocrats in the Heian Period (894-1185) was kai-awase.

Clamshells were split in two and painted with scenes from prominent works such as “The Tale of Genji” (*3) on the inside. It’s played by lining up the shells side-by-side and looking for the matching pairs. The paintings were composed of expensive materials, including gold leaf, and were incredibly ornate.

*3 Genji Monogatari (The Tale of Genji): a classic novel written by Murasaki Shikibu during the Heian Period (894-1185).

Match the Cards in Hanafuda

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Photo by Pixta

The word “karuta” originated from Portuguese. Before this word was introduced, cards were called “fuda.” Hanafuda is a typical example of this usage.

Hanafuda cards correspond to the 12 months of the year and depict flowers associated with each season. A pack contains 48 playing cards divided into 12 suits of four cards.

Have Fun Playing Häagen Mätching at Home!

Häagen Mätching: A Picture-Matching Game To Play At Home!

Picture courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

With players matching the lids of classic flavors, Häagen Mätching closely resembles traditional Japanese playing cards! This game will feel nostalgic for those who've previously played with a colorful deck of karuta or hanafuda cards.

Not only are the rules simple, but the game is also accessible for anyone to play around the world. If you want a taste of New Year’s festivities in Japan, then try your hand at “Häagen Mätching: Match the Flavors”!

Click to Play Häagen Mätching!

Sponsored by Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.
Main image courtesy of Häagen-Dazs Japan, Incorporated.

The information presented in this article is based on the time it was written. Note that there may be changes in the merchandise, services, and prices that have occurred after this article was published. Please contact the facility or facilities in this article directly before visiting.

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