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6 Japanese Sweets Found at Ginza

6 Japanese Sweets Found at Ginza

Tokyo 2015.10.07 Bookmark

Sweets sold in Ginza are small vibrant, and attract a lot of attention from souvenir seeking travelers. We hand-picked 6 delectable treats for you to check out.

Translated by Collin Radford

Written by OsawaKimie

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Day after day, people flock to Ginza, the city of shopping. It is an area known not only for its clothing and accessories, but did you know that it's also lined with Japanese sweets shops?

The sweets sold in Ginza are small and vibrant, and attract a lot of attention from travelers looking for souvenirs. For that reason, we've hand-picked six delectable treats for you to check out.

1. Ginza Kikunoya's Fukiyose Chiyo Dzutsumi (¥259 a piece, keeps for 50 days)

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On the underground 1st floor of Ginza Core is Ginza Kikunoya, which was established in 1890. The Fukiyose Chiyo Dzutsumi, wrapped in attractive Washi (paper made using traditional Japanese methods), contain several types of baked sweets and sugar candies.

Drawn by the generational tradition of this store, there are fans nation-wide. It is not only delicious, but they look so great that you will think twice about eating them.

2. Ginza Akebono's Himekuri Monaka (¥129 a piece, keeps for 18 days)

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At in the intersection of Ginza 4-chome is Ginza Akebono, a confectionery shop that opened in 1948. Its Himekuri Monaka is popular as a souvenir, with 30 continuous years on their shelves.

Inside of the chestnut-shaped skin is bean paste from Hokkaido (bean paste: azuki beans and sugar that have been thoroughly simmered. Often used in Japanese sweets) and diced chestnut. Its popularity also comes in part from its cute petite size.

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This shop is always bustling with customers in search of something sweet.

3. Matsuzaki Senbei's Shamidou (¥120 a piece, holds for 80 days)

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Matsuzaki Senbei is a Japanese confectionery shop that first opened in 1804. It's most well-known item is the Shamidou, which is a baked sweet that contains flour, sugar, and eggs, and has scenery from nature cooked onto it, which is then decorated with sugar honey.

The images they come with change with the seasons, and you can feel the the aesthetic sense of the owners.

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Many of the images can only be seen at this store; we recommend checking it out if you ever find yourself in Ginza.

4. Kuuya's Monaka (¥1,130 for 10, keeps for 7 days)

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With 131 years of history, the Japanese sweet shop Kuya's Monaka has been loved by such historic artists as Natsume Soseki, who is on the ¥1,000 note.

The outer layer is made with sticky rice that is steamed and then fried, then filled with tsubuan (tsubuan: bean paste that leaves the beans whole). The skin gives a slight crunch when you bite in, and releases a delicious aroma and refined flavor.

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Lovers of Japanese sweets say that, if you don't call and make reservations beforehand, they will sell out. If you can't make reservations, then you must get there right after they open, at 10am.

5. Ginza Akebono's Ogonmochi Ohagi and Shiratama Bean Daifuku (¥216 a piece, keeps only for a day)

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For those who are looking to enjoy Japanese sweets on the spot, rather than as a souvenir, we recommend Ginza Akebono's Ogonmochi Ohagi(*1) and Shiratama Bean Daifuku(*2). The ohagi is attractive for its chewy texture, and if you hold it in your mouth you feel taste the sweetness of the rice. The bean daifuku is characteristic for its soft outer shell and red peas. It has a slight saltiness to it, so the flavor remains in your mouth for a short while after you've finished.

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In Japan, there is a tradition of eating ohagi (or, botamochi) during ohigan (ohigan: a Japanese Buddhist event where they show thanks to their ancestors and nature during spring and fall). For this reason, Ogonmochi ohagi is sold in Ginza Akebono in the spring and fall (from the middle to the end of March, and from the middle to the end of September). We recommend you try them out for a taste of Japan's interpretation of the seasons.

*1……ohagi: a mix of standard- and sticky-rice cooked, and then wrapped in bean paste.
*2……daifuku: bean paste made from azuki beans wrapped in a layer of mochi.

6.Ginza Kikunoya's Agemanju (¥160 a piece, keeps only for a day)

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Ginza Kikunoya's agemanju is great for those looking for a shopping break. It is made with dough from wheat that has been kneaded and steamed, which is stuffed with bean paste, and then sprinkled with Macadamia nuts. The flavor is easy to get into for those still not quite used to Japanese sweets.

One of the great things about Ginza Kikunoya is that you can relax and enjoy your sweets with a cup of tea in the sitting area (tea comes free).

The artisans in Ginza work daily to maintain the generational flavor that has grown with the city over its long history. We would like everyone to get a taste of the tradition for themselves.

Information

Ginza Kikunoya Honten

Address: 5-8-20 Ginza,  Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Ginza Core B1
Hours: 11:00-20:00
Closed: Open year round
Wi-Fi: None
Accepted Credit Cards: Credit cards accepted
Language Accessibility: Japanese
Multi-Language Menus: None
Nearest Station(s): Tokyo Metro (Marunouchi/Hibiya/Ginza Lines) Ginza Station
Access: 5 minutes on foot from the A5 exit
Pricing: Under ¥999
Religious dietary considerations: -
Phone: 03-3571-4095
Homepage: Ginza Kikunoya

Ginza Akebono Honten

Address: 5-7-19 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Hours: 10:00-21:00 (Mon-Sat)
10:00-20:00 (Sunday and National Holidays)
Closed: Open year round
Wi-Fi: None
Accepted Credit Cards: Credit cards accepted
Language Accessibility: Japanese
Multi-Language Menus: None
Nearest Station: Tokyo Metro (Marunouchi/Hibiya/Ginza Lines) Ginza Station
Access: 1 minute on foot from the A1 exit
Pricing: Under ¥999
Religious dietary considerations: -
Phone: 03-3571-3640
Homepage: Ginza Akebono (Japanese)

Matsuzaki Senbei Honten

Address: 4-3-11 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Matsuzaki Building
Hours: 10:00-20:00 (Mon-Sat)
11:00-19:00 (Sunday and National Holidays)
Closed: Open year round
Wi-Fi: None
Accepted Credit Cards: Credit cards accepted
Language Accessibility: Japanese
Multi-Language Menus: None
Nearest Station: Tokyo Metro (Marunouchi/Hibiya/Ginza Lines) Ginza Station
Access: 1 minute on foot from the B4 exit
Pricing: ¥1,000-1,999
Religious dietary considerations: -
Phone: 03-3561-9811
Homepage: Matsuza Senbei (Japanese)

Ginza Kuya

Address: Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Ginza 6-7-19
Hours: 10:00-17:00 (Mon-Fri)
11:00-16:00 (Saturday)
Closed: Open year round
Wi-Fi: None
Accepted Credit Cards: None
Language Accessibility: Japanese
Multi-Language Menus: None
Nearest Station: Tokyo Metro (Marunouchi/Hibiya/Ginza Lines) Ginza Station
Access: 5 minutes on foot from the B5 exit
Pricing: ¥1,000-1,999
Religious dietary considerations: -
Phone: 03-3571-3304
Homepage: Ginza Kuya Tabe-log (Japanese)

The information presented in this article is based on the time it was written. Note that there may be changes in the merchandise, services, and prices that have occurred after this article was published. Please contact the facility or facilities in this article directly before visiting.

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